Sunshine Daydreaming.





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nuanced-subversion:

is this beautiful solidarity too much for you, anon?

(also, i feel bad for you.)

(via moon--cunt)

megaparsecs:

i just wanted to put this out there since im sure it’ll get written about differently tomorrow. 

(via stay-human)

scumplanet:

JUST A REMINDER THAT PLATONIC LOVE IS REALLY IMPORTANT AND I HOPE YOU ALL HAVE FRIENDS THAT YOU ARE IN LOVE WITH PLATONICALLY CAUSE THOSE FRIENDSHIPS ARE THE MOST BEAUTIFUL AND HONEST OK THANK YOU

(via petitsirena)

mypubliclands:

Visit the Centennial Mountains Wilderness Study Area in Montana!

This 28,000-acre mountain range, which forms the boundary between southwest Montana and Idaho, is some of southwest Montana’s wildest country. It is considered an important corridor for wildlife movement, providing an east-west trending mountain range connecting the Yellowstone Ecosystem with the rest of the northern Rocky Mountains. Abundant wildlife in the Centennial Mountains include moose, elk, deer, wolverines, badgers, black bears, a wide variety of birds, and occasionally wolves and grizzly bears. A variety of waterfowl, including trumpeter swans, can be found on the adjoining Red Rock Lakes National Wildlife Refuge. About 60 miles of the 3,100-mile Continental Divide National Scenic Trail runs through the mountain range. The CDT through the Centennials is usually well-maintained, although natural events can change conditions rapidly. Several side trails provide access from both the Montana and Idaho sides of the CDT. Wildflowers are especially abundant during the mid- to late summer.

Activities include hiking, horseback riding, camping, fishing, wildlife viewing, photography. BLM lands in the Centennial Mountains are closed to mountain biking except on roads open to motorized vehicles. 

Plan your visit to the Centennial Mountains.

Photos: Bob Wick, BLM Wilderness Specialist 

mucholderthen:

3D RENDERING OF AN ANCIENT CLUBMOSS, Leclercqia scolopendraScientific Illustration beyond the call of duty: Jeff Benca— grad student in the Department of Integrative Biology     and Museum of Paleontology at the University of California, Berkeley. 
When he submitted a paper describing a new (but extinct) species of  lycopod for publication, instead of a line drawing Jeff Benca included a detailed digitally rendered color reconstruction of the plant.  It was chosen as the  cover illustration for the March 2014 issue of the American Journal of Botany.

Called Leclercqia scolopendra, or centipede clubmoss, the plant lived during the “age of fishes,” the Devonian Period.
At that time, lycopods – the group Leclercqia belonged to – were one of few plant lineages with leaves. Leclercqia shoots were about a quarter-inch in diameter and probably formed prickly, scrambling, ground-covering mats.  (Phys.org)

TECHNICAL DESCRIPTION

Digital reconstruction of the centipede clubmoss, Leclercqia scolopendra sp. nov. (Protolepidodendraceae: Lycopsida) from the Middle Devonian Chilliwack flora of Washington state. 

SCIENTIFIC PAPER: Benca et al.— Applying morphometrics to early land plant systematics: A new Leclercqia (Lycopsida) species from Washington State, USA, pp. 510–520 AJB March 2014.

mucholderthen:

3D RENDERING OF AN ANCIENT CLUBMOSS, Leclercqia scolopendra
Scientific Illustration beyond the call of dutyJeff Benca
— grad student in the Department of Integrative Biology
    and Museum of Paleontology at the University of California, Berkeley. 

When he submitted a paper describing a new (but extinct) species of  lycopod for publication, instead of a line drawing Jeff Benca included a detailed digitally rendered color reconstruction of the plant.  It was chosen as the  cover illustration for the March 2014 issue of the American Journal of Botany.

Called Leclercqia scolopendra, or centipede clubmoss, the plant lived during the “age of fishes,” the Devonian Period.

At that time, lycopods – the group Leclercqia belonged to – were one of few plant lineages with leaves. Leclercqia shoots were about a quarter-inch in diameter and probably formed prickly, scrambling, ground-covering mats.  (Phys.org)

TECHNICAL DESCRIPTION

Digital reconstruction of the centipede clubmoss, Leclercqia scolopendra sp. nov. (Protolepidodendraceae: Lycopsida) from the Middle Devonian Chilliwack flora of Washington state.

SCIENTIFIC PAPER: Benca et al.— Applying morphometrics to early land plant systematics: A new Leclercqia (Lycopsida) species from Washington State, USA, pp. 510–520 AJB March 2014.

(via scientificillustration)

hellapunx:

*cuddles up close to you* *puts my mouth by your ear* I NEED CONSTANT REASSURANCE THAT YOU STILL ENJOY ME AND FIND OUR RELATIONSHIP APPEALING

(via peachstones)

petticoatruler:

"I totally saw a fox do this on National Geographic. How hard can it be?"

(Source: mrszombiexxx, via petitsirena)